My article, “I was there”, about my experience as a volunteer witnessing the creation of the nation’s first No Kill community has been re-published as a guest post on Nathan Winograd’s blog.  Read it here:  www.nathanwinograd.com/?p=13232

My article, “I was there”, about my experience as a volunteer witnessing the creation of the nation’s first No Kill community has been re-published as a guest post on Nathan Winograd’s blog.  Read it here:  www.nathanwinograd.com/?p=13232

nokilladvocacy:

From No Kill Advocacy director Nathan Winograd:

“Frightened by the escaping gas sound, they move anxiously in their chamber—some frantic, others frozen by their fear and trembling. Technical papers describe ‘vocalizations’ to make it sound more clinical and academic, but even one unfamiliar with dogs and cats would know to identify it as fear and stress—barking, crying, whining, howling. As the hissing of gas flooding the box continues, animals become disorientated, fall, collapse; but instead of a quiet, limp faint towards stillness, there is thrashing of hyper-excitable muscles twitching in the poisoned air, convulsions, the animals still ‘vocalizing,’ animals in phases of these states of fear and anxiety and distress. Some of the animals urinate and some defecate … adding disgust to the disgrace they’ve been fated to suffer.”

The fact that the majority of states still allow animals to be killed in this manner underscores the complete lack of national leadership in this movement. 
The fact that in every state but two, shelters can kill animals even when qualified rescue groups are willing to save the lives of those animals underscores the complete lack of national leadership in this movement. 
The fact that shelter directors can keep cages empty, refuse to work with volunteers, kill rather than foster baby puppies and kittens, and ban the adoption of animals based on the way they look underscores the complete lack of national leadership in this movement.
Today, shelters are the fiefdoms of those who run them. There are few checks and balances, few standards, and very little accountability. In a moment of candor, even HSUS admitted, “there is actually very little oversight of sheltering organizations.”
They hand-wring, they excuse, they obfuscate. They even fight reforms. But they do not solve problems. It’s time to stop writing checks and start rolling up our sleeves. Let’s do it ourselves.
Ban the gas chamber: http://bit.ly/12y3YEw
Rescue rights: http://bit.ly/13jSZJY
Shelter reform: http://bit.ly/18J9vr5
In short, there ought to be a law: http://bit.ly/19sKuTM

nokilladvocacy:

From No Kill Advocacy director Nathan Winograd:

“Frightened by the escaping gas sound, they move anxiously in their chamber—some frantic, others frozen by their fear and trembling. Technical papers describe ‘vocalizations’ to make it sound more clinical and academic, but even one unfamiliar with dogs and cats would know to identify it as fear and stress—barking, crying, whining, howling. As the hissing of gas flooding the box continues, animals become disorientated, fall, collapse; but instead of a quiet, limp faint towards stillness, there is thrashing of hyper-excitable muscles twitching in the poisoned air, convulsions, the animals still ‘vocalizing,’ animals in phases of these states of fear and anxiety and distress. Some of the animals urinate and some defecate … adding disgust to the disgrace they’ve been fated to suffer.”

The fact that the majority of states still allow animals to be killed in this manner underscores the complete lack of national leadership in this movement. 

The fact that in every state but two, shelters can kill animals even when qualified rescue groups are willing to save the lives of those animals underscores the complete lack of national leadership in this movement. 

The fact that shelter directors can keep cages empty, refuse to work with volunteers, kill rather than foster baby puppies and kittens, and ban the adoption of animals based on the way they look underscores the complete lack of national leadership in this movement.

Today, shelters are the fiefdoms of those who run them. There are few checks and balances, few standards, and very little accountability. In a moment of candor, even HSUS admitted, “there is actually very little oversight of sheltering organizations.”

They hand-wring, they excuse, they obfuscate. They even fight reforms. But they do not solve problems. It’s time to stop writing checks and start rolling up our sleeves. Let’s do it ourselves.

In short, there ought to be a law: http://bit.ly/19sKuTM

wwf:

Some places are worth fighting for, Virunga National Park is one of them. WWF is asking you to DRAW THE LINE to save Africa’s oldest and most biodiverse park from oil exploration.

Sign up at Panda.org

nprfreshair:

It’s almost as good as being at the Musée d’Orsay… maybe even better because a scary security guard isn’t yelling at you for having your nose centimeters away from priceless art. 

You can now see incredible detail of Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings through the Google Art Project.

via Twisted Sifter 

j0hny0ss4ri4n:

A fang-blenny (Meiacanthus sp.) hiding in a sponge, shows off his impressive little fangs :3 - Lembeh Straits, Indonesia
(photo: YAAAAAWN! by Martin-Klein on Flickr)

j0hny0ss4ri4n:

A fang-blenny (Meiacanthus sp.) hiding in a sponge, shows off his impressive little fangs :3 - Lembeh Straits, Indonesia

(photo: YAAAAAWN! by Martin-Klein on Flickr)

(Source: lifeunderthewaves)